Christian Couple Sues Over Trans Child Wearing Dress at School P-admin Atheist Republic

Read More Atheist Republic A Christian couple from the Isle of Wight in the British Isles plans to sue the government over the transgender guidelines implemented by the school previously attended by their children. The couple plans to request a judicial review over the Department for Education’s support of Cornwall Schools Transgender Guidance.
The Cornwall Schools Transgender Guidance was first written in 2012 as a collaboration between the IntercomTrust, Devon and Cornwall Police, and the Cornwall Council. The guidance’s purpose is to “minimize distress and disruption to pupils, students, and schools, through Trans inclusivity.”
Nigel (48) and Sally (46) Row believe that the guidance promoted by the Department of Education should be replaced by guidance that “protects children from partisan materials that lead them down a road of irreversible harm.”
In 2016, the couple stopped sending their older son to the Church of England’s school because one of his classmates came out as a trans girl. The couple said that they’d decided because their son was confused “to the point of being unwell and stressed.”
In 2017, the Rows pulled out their second child from the Church of England primary school when after their then six-year-old boy came home from school, “confused as to why a boy was now a girl.” The child was confused because one of his male classmates would wear clothes for boys and sometimes wore clothes for girls.
Both the children are now homeschooled.
The Times reported that the school made the couple choose. They were asked to either affirm transgenderism or be labeled. The couple told The Times that they believe that children should be discouraged from transgenderism. “Boys are boys, and girls are girls,” they added.
Sally reasoned that six-year-olds are not even allowed to vote, let alone get a tattoo. It is “immoral to think that they can make such life-changing decisions at such a young age,” she added.
In an interview with The Times, a spokesperson for the Department for Education said they acknowledged that the “issues relating to gender identity can be complex and sensitive.” “Schools are best placed to work with parents, pupils, and public services to decide what is best for individual children,” the spokesperson added.